Father’s Day 2019

Owen woke me up at 6:30 on Father’s Day, with a gift of matching pyjamas – fortunately he let me go to back to bed for a bit, before we went downstairs for a very light breakfast in our matching pyjamas. The reason for the very light breakfast was that we would be meeting my Mum, Dad and brother for brunch at Dough and Brew in Warwick. The breakfast pizzas are my absolute favourite breakfast anywhere. It seems to have become a regular Father’s Day thing for us. Previously I have cycled both there and back – as the route from Coventry is mostly off road. However, with the recent rain, which cancelled the Malverns Classic MTB festival we should have been at yesterday, I figured I would be too muddy to sit in a restaurant if I rode there. So I strapped my hardtail to the roof of the car and so I could at least ride back.

The only problem with having a massive pizza is feeling a bit sluggish on the ride home – especially as it is mostly uphill back to Coventry from Warwick. Riding out of the town centre I felt pretty fresh, so decided to add in an extra loop around Hatton to include a fun section of bridle way that I missed by not riding down – which is where I stopped to take the photo at the top of this post.

I was really enjoying being on a leisurely cross country ride on my hardtail, the sun was out, the trails were running well and my bike was feeling super fast without Owen on the Mac Ride! I also felt a bit naked riding without knee pads and wearing a short sleeved t-shirt, rather than a jersey, but it was only a gentle ride! Then the clouds came over and it started to rain gently at first, so I kept going. As I was approaching a farm it got heavier, so I took shelter next to a barn to put my jacket on. When I turned around I noticed a whole field of cows walking towards me – fortunately on the other side of a fence. They must have been after my jelly babies! By the time I left the cows the rain had almost stopped again, but I knew I was about to ride through the muddiest section of the ride, so kept the waterproof on until I was out of the mud. The rest of the ride, on familiar trails,
went without a hitch and with my extra loop I clocked just over 34km.

As we were seeing my Mum again the next day, Owen went home with her for a mini break in the Cotswolds. With only a chilled out Henry to deal with, Jen was keen to crack on with the DIY when I got home. Seven years after starting, we are now at a phase with the #119project where we are redecorating rooms, although to be fair some of the bits we are doing in the kitchen weren’t really finished in 2012… We pulled the fridge freezer out of the pantry, I got to work chipping the ice out of it (and sucking it up with my wet and dry vac), whilst Jen repainted the pantry walls which were looking a bit scruffy. Given we started this project after the shops had shut on a Sunday afternoon we were lucky to have found a pot of the right paint stashed away! I had to keep having Henry cuddling breaks, although he did spend most of the time sat in his bouncer supervising – I had put him in his dungarees, but he decided not to get his hands dirty. We finished just in time to watch the new Top Gear and eat some amazing Moroccan lamb (one of our favourites from our local butchers. Henry spent his first night in his bedroom (my old office which he annexed).

It was a busy, but fun day. I hardly spent any time with Owen, but I have got the next week off work, so will make sure we do plenty of fun things together!

Owen’s Third Birthday Weekend Including Monster Jam

I can hardly believe it has been three years since Owen was born unexpectedly early, but it was his third birthday last week and we had an extra long weekend celebrating it!

On his birthday he rushed into our bedroom first thing in the morning to remind us that it was his birthday and ask if he had any presents! Fortunately “Henry” had bought him a Playmobil Mountain Biker, which kept him entertained for a while. I find it cute how Owen still refers to it as “the bike that Henry got me”. Then we came downstairs and Owen discovered the big pile of presents, which he unwrapped over breakfast. By far his favourite were the Playdoh Wheels sets – one of the only things he has asked for after seeing it on an advert. But Playdoh and construction vehicles is pretty much heaven for Owen, so I can understand why! Unfortunately he had to go to nursery in the morning, so had to leave his new toys. He did ride his bike to nursery though – it is only a kilometre away, so even Owen riding is quicker than driving, despite me carrying Henry in his baby carrier, meaning I could not really run after Owen. While Owen was at nursery, Jen and I got the house ready for his party, then I snuck off to the pump track for a few laps.

Owen had a good morning at nursery and was excited to see that his Grandma and Grandpa had joined us to collect him. I was proud that when Owen realised both Jen and I were there without Henry, who was waiting with my parents, his first thought was to ask where his little brother was. Of course, when we got home there were even more presents from Grandma and Grandpa! Later in the afternoon his guests arrived for the party, it was only a small affair, with both sets of grandparents and Owen’s best friend, Cara. Owen and Cara had fun playing together with Owen’s new toys. Then it was time for the cake – Jen had excelled herself here, the chocolate “construction site” themed cake looked amazing and tasted even better!

Friday is Owen’s swimming day, so I took him to his lesson as usual. He has been doing really well recently, but did particularly well this week, putting his face in the water, jumping in and insisting on swimming on his own when the pool noodles were given out. He was swimming lengths of the pool on his own with his arms over the noodle. After swimming Jen’s friend came round with her little boy, so Owen had another fun afternoon playing. For dinner we went to Owen’s favourite restaurant – “McDonald’s with the softplay”, which is right at the other side of the city, but Owen always asks to go there. Incidentally, the last time Jen and I were there was about ninety minutes before Henry was born. Owen ate his dinner like a good boy, then was let loose on the softplay! It was interesting watching him, as he has obviously grown so much in confidence since our last visit at the start of the year. Usually he just does laps of the same section, but this time he went exploring – right to the top of the softplay structure! Maybe it is time to try taking him climbing again?

Owen’s usual Ready Steady Riders session was cancelled on the Saturday, due to the poor weather, so we just had a quiet morning at home – because in the afternoon we were going to Monster Jam! Monster Jam is a huge touring monster truck show, and Owen loves monster trucks almost as much as diggers. So when I heard it would be coming to the Ricoh Arena in Coventry on Owen’s birthday weekend I knew we had to go! Monster trucks are too loud for Henry (Jen had an excuse not to come), so my Dad joined us – we have talked for years about the three generations watching motorsport together, so this was a good opportunity. As soon as we got to the arena we saw the monster trucks in the pits, along with some construction vehicles that made the track – Owen’s day was already made!

Once in the stadium the first of the monster truck events was a series of head to head races – Owen loved it! He was cheering on the trucks and clapping excitedly at the end of the races! I was glad that he was wearing his ear defenders, as even quite high up in the stadium the trucks were really loud. Owen was less excited by the next event, the donut competition. He was upset that the monster trucks were not jumping! I enjoyed the donut competition, especially as most of the trucks did their donuts at our end of the stadium. I also liked that the scores were voted for by the fans in the stadium on a special website. After the donuts the trucks went back to the pits and the construction equipment came out to redo the track and prepare it for the freestyle motocross riders – which Owen enjoyed almost as much as the monster trucks! The freestyle motocross riders were as impressive as ever and hopefully Owen did not take too much inspiration.

When the monster trucks came back out they had a two wheel skills competition, which was not that impressive, possibly because the track was so slippery due to the rain meaning most of the trucks failed to do their stunts. One truck, Max-D, ended up on its roof – which prompted lots of questions from Owen. “Why is it upside down? Why did it land on its roof? Why did the stunt go wrong?” etc. However the final event, the freestyle competition was by far the highlight of the show. The trucks each had two minutes to perform stunts on as many of the obstacles in the arena as possible. There were huge jumps, donuts and even a backflip – right in front of us (albeit with the truck landing on its roof)! It was a great afternoon out for all three generations of Craik and I would certainly go again.

After the excitement of Monster Jam on Saturday, we had a quieter Sunday. I dropped Jen and the boys off at Jen’s friend’s house in Nuneaton, then went for a bike ride at Pooley Country Park, near Tamworth (and even used my GoPro for one of the runs). Jen and the boys had gone for a walk/bike ride to the park when I got back to Nuneaton, so I rode to meet them and rode back with Owen for lunch. We had a few errands to run on the way home, including stopping at Jen’s parent’s house for tea and cake, which was a nice way to wind down after a busy weekend. Next weekend is also going to be exciting as we are going to the Malverns Classic mountain bike festival, where Owen will be racing dual slalom on his balance bike! Does anyone know how to explain slalom to a three year old…

Bank Holiday Trip to Llandegla

Llandegla in North Wales is one of my favourite trail centres to ride at, it is perfect for when I want somewhere a bit different to Cannock Chase, but still familiar enough that I can just turn up and ride without worrying about navigation and finding the trail. I have ridden at Cannock twice recently, both with and without Owen, and had new brakes to test on my Orange Four – so Llandegla was perfect! I even managed to wake up early and was out of the house by 8:30, which is almost unheard of for me. The only thing I had forgotten to do was check the weather forecast – I had gone prepared for a warm spring day. It was a cold spring day, with rain on and off. I was glad that I had left my waterproof jacket in my riding pack.

I was on the trail by 10:30, the long climb at the start of the trail went quickly, and I was feeling confident. However I always forget that the red trail has even more climbing after that! What was of more concern to me on the ride down to “Snowdon View” was that the rear suspension on my bike felt too stiff, I was being shaken around (looking back at my post from the last time I rode there, I was adjusting my suspension too – it must be something about the trail). However I also had a few pedal strikes, indicating that my suspension was too soft.

My suspension set up ponderings were interrupted by my arrival at the “Double Steep Climb”, which like last year, I smugly thought the trail diversion had avoided. Like the name implies, it is really steep, I had to get off and push. The view at the top was worth it though, and was where I took the photo at the top of this post. I carried on round the trail, enjoying the descents and cursing all the steep climbs that I had forgotten about. Whilst it isn’t enjoyable at the time, I do like the sense of achievement from slowly making it up the climbs.

After finishing the red trail I treated myself to lunch in the cafe – southern fried chicken on macaroni cheese. Yum! The food at Llandegla is always good, which almost made up for it taking 45 minutes to come out. Not ideal when you want to be riding and are having to sit outside to keep an eye on your bike because the bike stands are too fat to get your lock round! Fortunately the food made up for it!

After lunch I went for a lap of the blue trail, it is the same long climb as the red trail, but takes a gentler path back down to the start – still with a few climbs though! The first section of the blue trail, from where it splits from the red trail to the woods, is one of my favourite sections of trail anywhere. Fast and flowing, and usually empty! I think I actually prefer the blue trail to the red. The last section of the blue trail, from the reservoir back to the cafe joins up with the green beginners trail. Riding that made me think it would be ideal to ride with Owen, either on the Mac Ride, or next year when he has his own bike. Green trails are usually just fire roads, but this one has single track and berms and even goes past a pump track – Owen would love it!

On the long drive home (thankfully not too much longer than normal, despite the bank holiday traffic), I was thinking about my suspension settings again and decided that I really need to get it sorted. When I got home I posted my thoughts on the Fox Suspension UK Facebook group. It was pointed out that I am running my fork too soft (I have been reducing the pressure to try and get it to use the full travel) which makes my bike too low – probably causing the pedal strikes. It was also mentioned that the suspension works better the faster you ride, so maybe more fitness work needed too! With help from the other members I have devised a plan: first, I need to get the fork set up correctly by increasing the air pressure, this will mean it uses less of the travel, so I will need to open the fork up and remove some spacers from the air chamber, which should give me full travel. Then, once the fork is sorted, I can work on adjusting the rear shock. Hopefully I will  be able to get out over the next few days, on trails that I am familiar with, and make these adjustments.

Henry’s New Trick


As I have just shared two very Owen centric posts, I thought I should also blog about Henry! He is doing really well, drinking loads of milk, and although it feels like he never sleeps, I think he is actually doing better than Owen was at this age! The most important thing though is that he has learned to smile – as if he could look any cuter!

Pistonheads Sunday Service at Aston Martin

Owen and I had a great morning visiting the Aston Martin factory in Gaydon for the Pistonheads Sunday Service. Owen has been to a few Pistonheads events before, but only as a baby in a pushchair, this would be our first one just the two of us in the MR2. My parents were also going, so I knew I would have back up if needed.

One of my favourite parts of Sunday Services is the convoy down with my friends from the Pistonheads Midlands forum, it was Owen’s first time experiencing this. He was made to feel very welcome, and enjoyed checking out the ten or so cars assembled before we set off. Once back in the MR2 it became clear that Owen had a favourite car – he was asking about “the fast version of Grandpa’s car” (a Jaguar Project 8) all the way to Gaydon! He definitely has good taste in cars!

At Gaydon I was going to park next to a group of Toyota GT86s, but at the last moment spotted a space next to a 1920s “Blower” Bentley – as much as a line of sporty Toyotas would have been cool, Bentleys are way cooler! As we were checking out the Toyotas (I decided not to tell Owen one was actually a Subaru – two identical looking cars being made by different companies would have caused a flood of “whys”), my parents turned up in their Porsche. So I suggested to Owen we had a look at a cool Porsche I had spotted. He was happy to see his grandparents and excitedly told them about the cars we had seen. As we walked past the Jaguar Project 8 he told my Dad that it had a big wing and big brakes. We then looked at a lovely yellow Triumph TR6 – exactly the same as the one my Dad had when I was a toddler!

Inside the Aston Martin HQ/factory Owen was most excited about the model cars in the gift shop, but with prices starting at £180, he left empty handed. As we walked from the entrance to the cafe to grab some breakfast, there was a display of Aston Martin cars from 1905 through to the current day, which we all enjoyed. My favourite was the DB5 “Superleggera” – I have not even dared to check how much they are worth though! Aston Martin had loads of staff on hand to help people and had obviously put a lot of effort in to hosting the event. When Owen started to get into a grump as we were leaving, straight away an employee came to offer him a sticker, which cheered him up. Owen proudly wore his Aston Martin sticker for the rest of the day!

With so many new Aston Martin cars about, on display and in the car park, the main thing that struck me was just how big they are, with the exception of the Valkyrie. Maybe it is because I am used to my little MR2 Roadster, but they all looked huge! My Dad and I agreed that the previous generation Vantage looked perfect though.

Every time I visit the Aston Martin part of Gaydon (they share the site with Jaguar Land Rover) I leave thinking “this would be a great place to work!” – I have been keeping an eye on their job postings, but have yet to see anything that would suit me… Owen seemed to really enjoy his morning, other than the one almost-tantrum he was on his best behaviour, but the excitement was obviously too much for him, as he fell asleep on the way home, despite the roof being down in the MR2.

Owen’s Strider Progress: May 2019

It has been almost a year since I last blogged about Owen’s progress on his Strider balance bike and according to my Instagram “Memories” exactly a year since he started riding it. A lot has changed, mostly in the last couple of months.

Since last summer Owen loved riding his Strider, especially on pump tracks. We have become regulars at Ready Steady Riders and it is the highlight of his week. If you live in the West Midlands and have kids under 6 who love bikes, you should really check them out! Like crawling, and to some extent walking, Owen had his own way of doing things (straddling the bike and walking with it, not putting his bum on the seat) which he was happy with, so carried on doing it, rather that making the final step to riding properly. I expect this will be a pattern for other skills he is yet to learn. Despite this, Owen was really enjoying himself and that is the most important thing.

Since the start of this year he started making really good progress, I could tell he was getting more confidence. Then he started sitting on the seat and one Ready Steady Riders session I noticed his feet coming up off the ground, within a few weeks this became a proper balance bike glide – after eleven months he had really cracked it! Like with crawling/walking there was no stopping him!

He had a great Ready Steady Riders session on Easter Saturday. It was a low turnout due to the bank holiday, so for the last part of the session Coach Kazzi asked if the riders would like to sample the “big track” – a full UCI championship spec Adult BMX track. Owen did not need to be asked twice, he was straight round to the big track! The riders sessioned the last part of the final straight, which was bigger than any pump track I have ever ridden. Owen needed help on the very steepest section, but had the rest nailed. He was so pleased with himself every time he rode under the finish gantry. Ever since he has been telling me that he is “big and tough and can ride on the big track”. Last week Owen also had a good Ready Steady Riders session, watched by Jen and Henry, and sporting a new helmet. The session ended with Owen being awarded a medal for being “Rider on the week”! Yet another proud Dad moment!

He has also been using his Strider around our local area, riding to the shops, or to nursery etc. He has been great at staying on the pavement, stopping at crossings and looking out for cars. On Bank Holiday Monday, Jen suggested that Owen should ride his Strider to Earlsdon Festival, by far his longest ride. It did not start well, Owen seemed to be struggling with riding and talking at the same time – a real problem for a chatterbox like Owen! He was stopping every few metres to tell me something, or ask a question (he has reached the “why” phase). I ended up having to carry the bike for a bit, in any case he would not have been able to ride through the festival crowds. But after an ice cream, he was back on the bike for the ride home. We went back through our local woods, on a rooty trail we had ridden on the Mac Ride the day before. Owen enjoyed this and seemed to get a second wind. Then we got to his favourite ramp in the woods – a feature we always visit when we’re in the woods. He had to hit it multiple times before even considering riding back home. Even though I carried the bike for a lot of the time, it was still easily double the longest ride he had done with me.

This afternoon, after a ride to town on the Mac Ride, Owen asked me to go for a ride round to the woods with him. After his success last week, I risked taking my own bike along too. After we had ridden over Owen’s favourite ramp, he asked if we could go to the cycle speedway track further along Hearsall Common. The shortest way to the cycle speedway was along the rooty singletrack from last week – our first singletrack ride together. Owen loved the cycle speedway track, I had said he could do five laps, but I had to practically drag him away screaming after fifteen! The ride back home showed that Owen has got the bike skills, but is still lacking a bit of the discipline needed to be able to come out on bike rides.

Owen has got the hang of his Strider just in time – next month he has two races: at the Malverns Classic mountain bike festival and the Strider Cup at Kingsbury Water Park. Unfortunately these are both just after his birthday, so he will be the youngest racer in the three year old class. Hopefully his ability to follow instructions has improved as much as his riding, after his performance last year. Once the racing is out of the way, we will try some more sessions on the big track and possibly even start looking for a bike with pedals…

Automatically Deploying Website from Git to AWS S3

I am a big fan of Amazon AWS – this blog has been running on it for a few years now. Since moving to AWS S3 (for storage) and CloudFront (as a Content Delivery Network) to host static websites, such as my homepage, I have been trying to work out how to get them to automatically deploy when I update the Git repository I use to manage the source code. I looked in to it in some detail last year and concluded that AWS CodePipeline would get me close, but would require a workaround as it did not support deploying to S3. In the end I decided that a custom AWS Lambda function was needed.

Lambda is a service that hosts your code, in a state where it is ready to run when triggered, without needing to have a server. You are only billed for the time your code is running (above a free threshold), so it is perfect for small infrequent jobs, such as deploying changes to a website or even using it with Alexa for home automation. It seemed like an interesting area to explore and gain some knowledge, but I think I went in at the deep end, trying to develop a complex function, using an unfamiliar language (Node.js) on an unfamiliar platform. Then other tasks popped up and it fell by the wayside.

Then earlier this year I saw an announcement from AWS that CodePipeline would now support deploying to S3 and thought my problem had been solved. Although I must admit that I was a bit disappointed not to have the challenge to code it myself. Fast forward a few months and I had the opportunity to set up the CodePipeline, which was very easy. However, it only supported copying the code from the Git repository to the S3 bucket. It did not refresh Cloudfront, so my problem remained unsolved.

The CodePipeline did allow for an extra step to be added at the end of the process, which could be a Lambda function, so I went off in search of a Lambda function to trigger an invalidation on CloudFront when an S3 bucket has been updated. The first result I found was a blog post by Miguel Ángel Nieto, which explained the process well, but was designed to work for one S3 bucket and one CloudFront distribution. As I have multiple websites, I wanted a solution that I could deploy once, and use for all websites, so my search continued. Next I came across a blog post by Yago Nobre, which looked to do exactly what I needed. Except that I could not get the source code to work. I tried debugging it for a while, but was not making much progress. It did give me an understanding of how to link a bucket to a CloudFront distribution, trigger the Lambda function from the bucket and use the Boto3 AWS SDK for Python to extract the bucket ID and CloudFront distribution from the triggering bucket – all the things that were lacking from the first blog post/sample code. Fortunately both were written in Python, using the Boto3 AWS SDK, so I was able to start work on merging them.

I was not terribly familiar with the Python language, to the point of having to search how to make comments in the code, but I saw it as a good learning experience. What I actually found harder than the new-to-me language, was coding in the Lambda Management Console, which I had to do, due to both the inputs and outputs for the function being other AWS features, meaning I could not develop locally on my Mac. Discovering the CloudWatch logs console did make things easier, as I could use the print() function to check values of variables at various stages of the function running and work out where problems were. The comprehensive AWS documentation, particularly the Python Code Samples for S3 were also helpful. Another slight difficulty I experienced was the short delay between the bucket being updated and the Lambda function triggering, it was only a few minutes, but enough to add some confusion to the process.

Eventually I got to a point where adding or removing a file on an S3 bucket, would trigger an invalidation in the correct CloudFront distribution. In the end I did not need to link it to the end of the CodePipeline, as the Lambda function is triggered by the update to the S3 bucket (which itself is done by CodePipeline). All that was left to do was to tidy up the code, write some documentation, and share it on Github for anyone to use or modify. I have kept this post more about the backgound to this project, the code, and instructions to use it are all on Github.

This code probably only saves a few minutes each time I update one of my websites, and may take a number of years to cancel out the time I spent working on it. Even more if I factor in the time spent on the original version prior to the CodePipeline to S3 announcement, but I find coding so much more rewarding when you are solving an actual problem. I also feel like I have levelled up as a geek, by publishing my first repository on Github. Now with this little project out of the way, I can start work on a new server, and WordPress theme for this blog, which was one of my goals for 2019.

Clean MR2

One of my goals for 2019 was to detail my MR2 Roadster. Now, this may not seem like a big goal, but given I last cleaned it in 2016, after a hoon to the Peak District, it was going to be a big job. As it is my pride and joy I wanted to do it properly – no cheating by taking it to the local hand car wash! Cleaning cars is something I find therapeutic, but to do it properly takes a lot of time, which is something increasingly rare for me these days.

Unfortunately I failed in my other MR2 goal, which was to get it to 60,000 miles before the MOT. I was 1,000 short, in fact it clicked over 59,000 while I was giving it an “Italian tune up”, after it initially failed the MOT on emissions.

Jen took the boys out to visit a friend, leaving me with an afternoon free – and a space on the drive! Getting the MR2 on to the drive is usually a three car shuffle, so one less car to deal with made things easier. In fact, my BMW also got a quick wash too and the drive got swept. The MR2 had the full works though: snow foam, two bucket wash, tar remover, fall out remover and a final rinse, before being driven back round to the garage to be dried, panel wiped and treated to a coat of Soft99 Fusso Coat Dark – a Japanese wax/sealant that I had bought for Jen’s Toyota Yaris and seemed to give good results. Given that the MR2 is usually garaged and rarely gets used in the rain, I would normally use a regular wax, but as I had a tin of this special wax for Japanese cars, it seemed a shame not to use it. Waxing the car I noticed that is has picked up a few chips and scratches, but from a few metres away I think it still looks great – especially now that it is clean. I had forgotten just how sparkly the Toyota Sable grey paint is.

After treating the roof and tyres with the appropriate potions, I was able to get out for a drive. It rained – typical! However I still had fun and when I pulled over in front of a yellow field, the sun popped out from behind the clouds and I was able to get a photo of my newly clean MR2.

Apple Watch Series 3 – Long Term Review

Jen bought me an Apple Watch for my birthday a few years ago. I have been meaning to write a short review for a while now, as today is the fourth anniversary of the original model being launched I thought it was a good day to publish it! I always prefer reading these long term reviews, to the usual short preview as a product is launched. I’m not a professional technology review, just a geek with a blog, so for a really detailed look check out DC Rainmaker’s review.

My watch is a non-cellular 42mm Apple Watch Series 3 in space grey, it came with a grey sport band. When Jen took me to the Apple Store, to refine the Apple Watch hints I’d dropped, I couldn’t get on with the sport band at all, so I told Jen I wasn’t fussed between the black or grey, as I planned to replace it straight away. However once I had the watch I quickly got used to the strap and probably would have preferred the black sports band. I have since bought a black sport loop – which has become my main strap, unless I am swimming, out in the rain or dealing with Henry, who is sicking up a lot of milk at the moment.

I had considered the cellular versions of the watch, but I didn’t think it would be worth the extra cost, both the purchase cost and the £5 per month service charge. I also actually prefer the look of the watch without the red dot on the crown, which signifies the cellular versions. The Apple Watch 4 solution of just a red ring looks a lot nearer. It is just a shame that the sport loop wasn’t available with the basic watch, only the cellular version, again this has been remedied with the new version – kudos to Apple for sorting these niggles.

When the original Apple Watch was announced, I wasn’t interested in it at all. I had (and still have) a couple of nice automatic watches and a Casio G-Shock, for when a more rugged watch was needed. Even though I considered myself more of a geek than a watch guy, I couldn’t see me wearing an Apple Watch rather than my other watches. Although I did appreciate some of the details and nods to traditional watches on the Apple Watch.

Fast forward a few years, Owen had been born, Jen was looking to get her fitness back and Apple had added GPS to the Series 2 Apple Watch, making it a much better prospect for a fitness watch. In addition to the fitness features I could see that having iPhone notifications on her wrist would be handy whilst wrangling a now wriggling Owen. So I took a flyer and bought Jen an Apple Watch Series 2 for her birthday. Much like when I’d bought her an iPad a few years before, it quickly became an essential device. This was very apparent when Jen forgot her watch charger when we went to Croyde and we had to ask her parents to bring it down when they joined us.

Shortly after Apple announced the Series 3 Apple Watch, now with a barometric altimeter, I was noticing some strange height results on my Strava. Things like gaining more altitude on short local rides, than when I’d been slogging uphill on longer rides at trail centres. This combined with seeing how useful Jen was finding her watch made me reconsider my view, so I started dropping hints for my birthday.

The fitness features, especially Strava, were my main reason for wanting an Apple Watch and I can safely say that my expectations were blown away! I would have been happy just using it with Strava to record my bike rides, but it is the off the bike fitness where it excels. The “three rings” concept, really encourages you to hit three different fitness goals each day – stand for at least a minute in an hour for twelve hours of the day, do at least thirty minutes of exercise and burn a predetermined number of calories (400 for me) by moving around. These daily goals are backed up with awards things like hitting goals on consecutive days, or doubling the move calorie targets. These targets are especially addictive, on more than one occasion I have found myself doing press ups before bed to continue a move streak, or getting up and going for a walk when the Watch reminds me that I’ve been sitting down for too long. I have however noticed oven the last six months or so that it has become a lot easier to hit my 400 calorie target – my Apple Watch wearing friends have also experienced this. I like to think we are getting fitter, or moving around more, but I expect that someone at Apple has modified the code.

I also use my Watch to track my sleep, it mostly confirms what I already knew, I’m a deep sleeper, but could do with going to bed a wee bit earlier. I also like the “Breathe” feature, although it always seems to prompt me to breathe worst moment. I don’t know what, if any, logic is behind these alerts.

The Watch includes a heart rate sensor, which has opened up a whole new load of data for me, especially during bike rides. On the other hand, too much data can be a bad thing! On a few occasions I have woken up to an alert on my Watch telling me it detected an abnormally high heart rate whilst I was asleep. This has led to various medical checks, none of which have found anything. So either there is a problem with the heart rate sensor on my Watch, or I have a rare/very occasional heart problem. I ordered a Wahoo Tickr heart rate monitor, which is on a chest strap, to help me rule out any problems with the Watch, but of course the issue has not reoccured. I now use the Tickr paired to my Watch to monitor heart rate on longer bike rides, as chest straps are meant to me more accurate than the optical sensors as used on the Watch.

Aside from fitness tracking I also use my Watch to preview notifications from my iPhone. I find it much easier to glance at my wrist to see a snippet of information, rather than taking my iPhone out of my pocket. Notifications from Apple apps, such as iMessages or email work great, you can usually see what the control the message is and give a brief response. However third party apps are a bit more hit and miss. For basic Siri tasks, such as setting a timer, it is much easier to use the Watch. I also find it useful on the bike, where I would usually need to remove my gloves to use my iPhone, I can send messages or even make and receive phone calls using Siri, whilst riding along! And Apple Pay – I doubt I will ever tire of being able to pay for things with my Watch.

The way the Watch and the iPhone hand off notifications to each other works seamlessly, which is actually frustrating for me as an owner of multiple Apple devices – if my Watch and iPhone can work that closely together why do I still get so many duplicated alerts on my Macs? Hopefully this is something Apple will work on in the future.

The only other problem I have with the Apple Watch is that I hardly ever wear my other watches these days. The Apple Watch integrates with my life so well that my mechanical watches rarely get worn. Sometimes I wonder if the stand goal is really to make sure that you are wearing your Apple Watch for at least twelve hours a day, rather than any other watch… I occasionally force myself to wear my mechanical watches, usually on special occasions and still love the amazing detail in the mechanisms, but I have been caught out trying to pay for shopping with them. The watch that has suffered the most is my G-Shock 5600, it used to be my daily watch, the only watch I would take when travelling etc but is neither as useful as the Apple Watch, nor as special as my technical watches. As I was writing this blog I took it out of my watch box and realised the battery was showing “low”, in the years I wore it was always on “high”, fortunately a few days on the windowsill recharged the battery for another few years.

On the subject of charging, when I first got the Apple Watch I charged it overnight, every night. If I forgot I could get two days use from one charge. These days I charge the Watch while I am getting changed, or having a shower – as it is only a small battery, it does not take long to charge at all.

To conclude, out of all the gadgets I have owned the Apple Watch fitted in to my life and made itself an essential item for me quicker than anything else. If I broke/lost it I would replace it without a doubt. It also makes me wonder what will happen to the luxury watch industry. I am usually a big fan of heritage and simplicity, but am now rarely found without my Apple Watch on my wrist.

Mac Ride: Initial Impressions

Owen has got too big and heavy for his rear mounted bike seat. This came to a head a few months ago when we over balanced negotiating a tricky manoeuvre, at in the lane behind our house. I ended up bashing my head on a concrete fence post, necessitating a new helmet for me and leaving with a headache for two weeks. Fortunately Owen was OK, but I knew it was the last time we would use that seat.

From reading the Little Rippers Facebook group and The Bike Dads website I knew that a Mac Ride would be Owen’s next seat. They have recently started shipping them from the UK, which avoids import duties and handling fees for the customer. As you may have spotted on my Instagram, I have bought one!

The Mac Ride attaches to the steerer tube with a special headset spacer, then clamps onto the seat post. As my hardtail was due a service, I was cleaning/greasing the headset anyway, fitting the spacer was easy. I also had to remove my grips, brake levers and shifter to fit some small grips for Owen and also pump up my fork to account for the extra 16kg. As my hardtail is mainly used for commuting and pump track I can live with the forks being hard when I’m riding without Owen. Owen always enjoys helping me work on bikes, but was even keener as he knew we were fitting a seat for him!

After fitting the Mac Ride we only had a short amount of time for a test ride before heading out for Easter festivities. Owen was a bit scared when it came to getting on the bike, but within a few pedal strokes he was loving it. He said the view was much better than his old rear mounted seat, meaning he could spot all the dogs in the woods and cars with lions (Peugeots). To me it felt like he was more involved in the ride, rather than just being a passenger. I also felt the balance of the bike was significantly better than with a rear seat, the only downside is that in my normal position my knees catch Owen’s bum when pedalling, so I need to spread my knees out slightly.

We tried some rooty single track in the woods, which was bumpy, especially for Owen, as he wanted to stay sat down. To make the most of the Mac Ride he will need to learn to stand up on the foot pegs, but as he is being encouraged to keep his bum on the seat of his balance bike at the moment, standing up can wait! The bike felt heavier to me, but still balanced. I think I will struggle to lift the front wheel with the extra weight, so no jumps or drop offs for us!

I can see that Owen and I are going to have a lot of fun adventures this summer (and maybe next), I have already been scoping out building sites so I can take him to watch diggers, and Little Rippers are run Mac Ride rideouts, which I am sure Owen will enjoy. Then of course in a few years, it will be Henry’s turn!